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Los Angeles Teachers Stay Strong; Win Improvements

Wed, 23 Jan 2019 17:24:48 +0000

Los Angeles Teachers Stay Strong; Win Improvements

UTLA
UTLA

Less than a month into 2019, the teachers of Los Angeles have proven that last year’s wave of collective action isn’t quieting down. After taking to the streets in a strike that has captured the country’s imagination, members of United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) are returning to classrooms today after overwhelmingly approving a paradigm-shifting contract that delivers on key demands.

For six days, more than 30,000 UTLA teachers went on strike to shine a light on the daily realities of a neglected and underfunded public school system. They demanded better, and by standing together, they won it. Here are just a few critical improvements in UTLA’s new contract:

  • A much-deserved 6% pay raise with no contingencies;

  • A nurse in every school five days a week;

  • A teacher librarian in every secondary school five days a week;

  • Hard caps on class size that will go into effect immediately in 2019–2020, with additional improvements every year after;

  • A commitment to reduce testing by 50%;

  • Hard caps on special education caseloads; and

  • A clear pathway to cap charter schools.

“For too long teachers have lived with a hard truth to tell—that for years our students were being starved of the resources they need,” said UTLA President Alex Caputo-Pearl following the vote. “Our expectations were fundamentally raised by this strike. Together, we said we deserve better, our students deserve better. We must keep our expectations high and not let go of this moment, because the next struggle is right around the corner.”

Kenneth Quinnell Wed, 01/23/2019 - 12:24

The Fierce Urgency of Now

Tue, 22 Jan 2019 18:34:35 +0000

The Fierce Urgency of Now

MLK Conference
AFL-CIO

Hundreds of labor and social justice activists descended on the nation’s capital this weekend for the 2019 AFL‑CIO Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Civil and Human Rights Conference. AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka kicked off the gathering by telling participants that this is our moment for action: “We’re living in the fierce urgency of now. This is a time to take risks. This is a time to get uncomfortable. That’s when real progress is made.”

The MLK Conference also featured a number of panels on Friday evening, including a town hall conversation with Andrew Gillum, 2018 nominee for governor of Florida.

He told participants: “Nobody understands ‘the fierce urgency of now’ better than labor. Dr. King...was laboring to build a better environment. That if you do an honest day’s work, you ought to be paid an honest day’s wage.... You ought to have access to health care, a wage you can live on, and your race, your gender and whom you love should not dictate how you get treated at work.”

You can watch his entire conversation with Melanie L. Campbell, president and CEO of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, here.

Hundreds of participants kicked off Saturday morning by rallying at the AFL-CIO headquarters in solidarity with the federal employees affected by the government shutdown. They then took to the streets to join with thousands more activists from across the country to march for workers’ and women’s rights.

Sunday’s awards gala honored fighters like the late Augusta Thomas, national vice president for women and fair practices emeritus, AFGE. You can see a roundup of awardees here.

Monday was a day of community service throughout Washington, D.C. Activists visited patients in nursing homes, cleaned up and painted walls and murals at area schools.

Kenneth Quinnell Tue, 01/22/2019 - 13:34

We've Had Enough; Do Your Job: In the States Roundup

Tue, 22 Jan 2019 16:23:49 +0000

We've Had Enough; Do Your Job: In the States Roundup

In the States
AFL-CIO

It's time once again to take a look at the ways working people are making progress in the states. Click on any of the links to follow the state federations on Twitter.

Alaska AFL-CIO:

Arizona AFL-CIO:

Arkansas AFL-CIO:

California Labor Federation:

Colorado AFL-CIO:

Connecticut AFL-CIO:

Florida AFL-CIO:

Georgia AFL-CIO:

Idaho State AFL-CIO:

Illinois AFL-CIO:

Indiana State AFL-CIO:

Iowa Federation of Labor:

Kentucky State AFL-CIO:

Maine AFL-CIO:

Metro Washington (D.C.) Council AFL-CIO:

Michigan AFL-CIO:

Minnesota AFL-CIO:

Missouri AFL-CIO:

Nevada State AFL-CIO:

New Hampshire AFL-CIO:

New York State AFL-CIO:

North Carolina State AFL-CIO:

Ohio AFL-CIO:

Oklahoma State AFL-CIO:

Oregon AFL-CIO:

Pennsylvania AFL-CIO:

Rhode Island AFL-CIO:

South Carolina AFL-CIO:

Tennessee AFL-CIO Labor Council:

Texas AFL-CIO:

Virginia AFL-CIO:

Washington State Labor Council:

West Virginia AFL-CIO:

Wisconsin State AFL-CIO:

Kenneth Quinnell Tue, 01/22/2019 - 11:23

Future of Work Commission Urges Bargaining Rights for Digital Platform Workers

Tue, 22 Jan 2019 14:58:55 +0000

Future of Work Commission Urges Bargaining Rights for Digital Platform Workers

ILO Report
ILO

A landmark report by the International Labor Organization’s (ILO’s) Global Commission on the Future of Work, released today, calls for giving full rights and protections, including collective bargaining rights, to digital platform workers. The ILO is the United Nations agency charged with promoting decent work and global labor standards.

The ILO Commission warns that, left to its current course, the digital economy is likely to widen both regional and gender divides. Crowd work and work mediated by digital apps could recreate 19th century working practices and lead to future generations of “digital day laborers.” Among other things, the commission calls for the following:

  • A “universal labor guarantee” to ensure that all workers, regardless of whether they are treated as employees or independent contractors, enjoy fundamental worker rights such as the right to bargain collectively; an adequate living wage; maximum limits on working hours; freedom from forced labor, child labor and discrimination; and the protection of worker health and safety.

  • Universal social protection—namely, universal health care, access to education, income support, unemployment compensation, workers’ compensation and disability and retirement benefits—for all workers in all forms of work, with governments supplementing a guaranteed minimum “social protection floor” with contributory social insurance programs.

  • A global governance system for digital labor platforms to ensure decent work across international jurisdictions.

According to the latest data from the Department of Labor, “electronically mediated work” currently accounts for 1% of the U.S. workforce. According to the latest research by the JPMorgan Chase Institute, digital labor platforms in the transportation sector currently account for 1% of the U.S. workforce, while digital labor platforms outside the transportation sector account for another 0.1%.

The ILO Commission further calls for “reinvigorating the social contract that gives working people a just share of economic progress”—what we might call a “Social Contract 2.0.”

While recognizing that rapid technological advances offer “remarkable opportunities” to promote good jobs and decent work, the commission maintains that we are now facing “one of the most important challenges of our times, as fundamental and disruptive changes in working life inherently affect our entire societies. Without decisive action, we will be sleepwalking into a world that widens inequality, increases uncertainty and reinforces exclusion, with destructive political, social and economic consequences.” While technological advances—such as artificial intelligence, automation and robotics—and the greening of the economy will create millions of new jobs, many jobs will disappear.

To build a fair and equitable future of work, the commission calls for putting people and the work they do at the center of economic policy, social policy and business practice. The commission’s “human-centered agenda” includes the following proposals:

  • Ensure the collective representation of all workers through public policies to actively promote freedom of association and collective bargaining; innovative organizing techniques; and the use of digital means to develop “new forms of connected action.”

  • A measurable agenda for gender equality, including gender-balanced parental leave; investment in public care services; stronger collective representation of women; the elimination of gender-based discrimination, including in the tech sector; pay transparency; and the elimination of violence and harassment at work.

  • More worker sovereignty over working time through minimum hour guarantees; maximum limits on working time; flexible schedules; premium pay for on-call waiting time and for work that is not guaranteed; and the application of technology to achieve balance between work and personal life.

  • Harness technology for decent work through collective bargaining over the design of work; a “human-in-command” approach to artificial intelligence to ensure that final decisions affecting work are taken by human beings rather than algorithms; regulation of the use of algorithmic management, surveillance and control of workers through sensors, wearables or other forms of monitoring; regulation of the use of worker data; and guaranteed access of workers to their own data.

  • Reshape business incentives for long-term investment, including through policies to promote tax fairness; revised corporate accountability standards; and enhanced representation of social and community stakeholders.

  • A universal entitlement to lifelong learning and skills training, including both informal and formal learning and training, from early childhood to adulthood.

  • Public investment in good jobs, including strategic investment in high-quality physical, digital and social infrastructure; the care economy; the green economy; and the rural economy.

  • Public investments to support people going through job transitions, including paid time off for training; quality apprenticeships; youth jobs programs; and the expansion of public employment services.

  • Better measures of economic progress to account for the value of unpaid household work; environmental degradation; and the distributional and equity dimensions of economic growth.

The commission’s report also highlights the following figures:

  • 190 million: The number of people in the world who are unemployed, of whom 64.8 million are young people.

  • 344 million: The number of jobs that will need to be created by 2030 to address unemployment.

  • 2.78 million: The number of people who die every year as a result of occupational accidents or work-related illnesses.

  • 300 million: The number of workers in the world who live in extreme poverty.

  • 1%: The percentage of the world’s population that received 27% of global income growth between 1980 and 2016, while the poorest 50% received only 12%.

  • 36.1%: The percentage of the global workforce that works excessive hours.

  • 20%: The gender pay gap, or the amount by which women are paid less than men.

  • 53.6%: The percentage of households with internet access (only 15% in emerging countries).

  • 2 billion: The number of people who make their living in the informal economy.

Kenneth Quinnell Tue, 01/22/2019 - 09:58

Extending a Helping Hand: The Working People Weekly List

Fri, 18 Jan 2019 15:31:52 +0000

Extending a Helping Hand: The Working People Weekly List

Working People Weekly List
AFL-CIO

Every week, we bring you a roundup of the top news and commentary about issues and events important to working families. Here’s this week’s Working People Weekly List.

Extending a Helping Hand to Those Affected by the Shutdown: "Across the country, working people are marching and rallying for an immediate end to the government shutdown. Already the longest funding lapse in American history, this manufactured crisis has put the weight of ideological extremism on federal workers and their families. As we continue fighting to reopen the government, the labor movement also is joining together to support our brothers and sisters as they go without a paycheck."

Stop Punishing Public Employees for Washington’s Failure to Lead: "How many of us could afford to work without being paid? How many of us would be 'fine' if we were suddenly laid off days before Christmas? For 800,000 Americans, including more than 12,000 Pennsylvania families directly affected by the government shutdown, the possibility of losing their homes, being late on their bills and facing unforgiving debt is all too real."

Federal Workers Seeking Unemployment Aid Doubles in Number: "The number of furloughed federal employees seeking unemployment benefits jumped in the first two weeks of the shutdown, topping 10,000 during the week of Jan. 5. The Labor Department said Thursday that is double the number of federal workers who sought aid in the previous week. Typically fewer than 1,000 former federal employees apply for jobless benefits each week."

As Shutdown Drags On, Some Step Up to Help Unpaid Federal Workers: "When the government shut down in late December, Morgan McKay offered free pizza and wine to furloughed and otherwise unpaid federal workers at her popular Denver restaurant, Oblio’s. Ms. McKay expected to host no more than three or four unpaid workers a night. Instead, a dozen or more have appeared nightly, joined by a new crop of paying customers who come to support her efforts."

Talks Resume as Los Angeles Teachers' Strike Runs for Fourth Day: "Negotiators for striking Los Angeles teachers and America’s second-largest school district returned to the bargaining table on Thursday for the first time since talks collapsed last week, as a walkout by some 30,000 educators ran for a fourth day. The strike has disrupted classes for nearly 500,000 students, though parents have turned out in large numbers to join teachers on picket lines and at their rallies. A recent Loyola Marymount University survey showed broad public support for the union’s cause across all demographics, especially among parents with school age children."

LMU: Majority of Los Angeles County Residents Supports Teachers’ Strike: "Nearly 80 percent of Los Angeles County residents said they support striking Los Angeles Unified School District teachers, according to survey results released Tuesday by Loyola Marymount University. Among respondents, 53% said they 'strongly support' and 24% 'somewhat support' teachers going on strike to achieve their demands in the labor dispute. Backing for the strike was at 60% or higher across all demographic categories, including age, ethnicity, income and political affiliation. Among parents with children at home, just 18% opposed the walkout, according to the survey conducted by the Thomas and Dorothy Leavey Center for the Study of Los Angeles at LMU."

Unions Raise Food and Money for Unpaid Federal Workers: "The Utah AFL-CIO has had a food pantry for years because there are often union members laid off of seasonal work, or whose industries are in a downturn, but this is the first time members of federal employee unions have been in need. 'There’s a lot of unfairness in it,' said Utah AFL-CIO President Jeff Worthington."

TSA Says Financial Stress of Shutdown is Forcing Growing Number of Officers to Stay Home: "Faced with growing numbers of call outs by its workers—and images of some of them lining up for food donations—leaders of the Transportation Security Administration acknowledged Wednesday that 'many employees are reporting that they are not able to report to work due to financial limitations.' Significant numbers of TSA agents have not been coming to work, either because of financial hardship or to underscore their opposition to being forced to work without pay."

Stop Starving Our Schools: "The streets of Los Angeles are packed with the sights and sounds of collective action this week. Braving the cold rain, some 30,000 United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) members turned out for picket lines across the city yesterday, joined by more than 10,000 parents, students and community members. Every L.A. school site—more than 900—participated in the strike, culminating in a 50,000-person march to the Los Angeles Unified School District’s (LAUSD’s) headquarters."

Thousands Rally in D.C. to #StopTheShutdown: "As the government shutdown became the longest in U.S. history, thousands of working people took to the streets of Washington, D.C., to send a clear message to the president and Congress to stop the shutdown and let federal government employees get to work. Thousands more rallied at other locations around the country."

No Joke: Worker Wins: "Our latest roundup of worker wins begins with several newsrooms using collective action and includes numerous examples of working people organizing, bargaining and mobilizing for a better life."

Kenneth Quinnell Fri, 01/18/2019 - 10:31

Extending a Helping Hand to Those Affected by the Shutdown

Thu, 17 Jan 2019 14:28:38 +0000

Extending a Helping Hand to Those Affected by the Shutdown

J. David Cox
AFL-CIO

Across the country, working people are marching and rallying for an immediate end to the government shutdown. Already the longest funding lapse in American history, this manufactured crisis has put the weight of ideological extremism on federal workers and their families. As we continue fighting to reopen the government, the labor movement also is joining together to support our brothers and sisters as they go without a paycheck.

If you have been impacted by the shutdown, there are a number of resources available to you. We are engaging a network of United Way/AFL-CIO labor liaisons and labor-associated community service organizations across the country to organize support; furloughed workers can call 2-1-1 to talk to a live, trained professional to find support and identify critical services.

Additionally, as a union member, you may be able to access a range of Union Plus benefits, including a $300 furlough grant, mortgage assistance, credit counseling, personal loans, auto insurance, and life and accident insurance.

Other resources available to those affected by the shutdown include:

Kenneth Quinnell Thu, 01/17/2019 - 09:28

Stop Starving Our Schools

Tue, 15 Jan 2019 20:37:42 +0000

Stop Starving Our Schools

UTLA
UTLA

The streets of Los Angeles are packed with the sights and sounds of collective action this week. Braving the cold rain, some 30,000 United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) members turned out for picket lines across the city yesterday, joined by more than 10,000 parents, students and community members. Every L.A. school site—more than 900—participated in the strike, culminating in a 50,000-person march to the Los Angeles Unified School District’s (LAUSD’s) headquarters.

Teachers and their allies aren’t letting up. From the leaders of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor and California Labor Federation to working people across the country, the entire labor movement is showing solidarity with UTLA’s fight for better lives, schools and communities. Here are just a few of the realities they’re working to change:

  • The cost of living has increased 27% since 2008.

  • California’s student-to-teacher ratio ranks 48 out of 50 states.

  • Students in transitional kindergarten to sixth grade take more than 100 standardized LAUSD tests.

  • California is the richest state in the nation, yet ranks 43 out of 50 in per-pupil spending.

  • California’s student-to-counselor ratio is 945:1.

  • L.A.’s charter school industry has grown by 287% since 2008, draining nearly $600 million from public schools each year.

Take action today and tell Superintendent Austin Beutner to meet the demands of Los Angeles teachers, parents and students.

Kenneth Quinnell Tue, 01/15/2019 - 15:37

Thousands Rally in D.C. to #StopTheShutdown

Tue, 15 Jan 2019 17:04:28 +0000

Thousands Rally in D.C. to #StopTheShutdown

#StopTheShutdown
AFL-CIO

As the government shutdown became the longest in U.S. history, thousands of working people took to the streets of Washington, D.C., to send a clear message to the president and Congress to stop the shutdown and let federal government employees get to work. Thousands more rallied at other locations around the country.

Facing a politically motivated crisis, federal workers desperately need the solidarity and backing of our brothers and sisters. Leaping into action over recent days and weeks, the AFL-CIO has mobilized the full resources of the labor movement behind them.

With the support of affiliates, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka (UMWA) successfully lobbied senators in halting consideration of any legislation until the government is reopened. Using our toll-free hotline, thousands of union members have contacted their senators to strengthen that effort.

In addition to the rally in D.C., we mobilized our state federations and central labor councils to turn out members for satellite rallies in dozens of communities across the country—from Colorado and Pennsylvania to Utah and Texas—demanding an immediate end to the shutdown and highlighting the fact that many of the workers locked out during the shutdown live outside of the nation's capital.

With each day that the shutdown drags on, the federation will expand and escalate our efforts. Working people won’t allow our brothers and sisters to be left out in the cold. We’re angry, we’re loud and we will be heard.

Here are what attendees said about the rallies in D.C. and around the country, using the hashtag #StopTheShutdown:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenneth Quinnell Tue, 01/15/2019 - 12:04

No Joke: Worker Wins

Tue, 15 Jan 2019 14:17:31 +0000

No Joke: Worker Wins

The Onion
The Onion

Our latest roundup of worker wins begins with several newsrooms using collective action and includes numerous examples of working people organizing, bargaining and mobilizing for a better life.

Onion Creative Staff Approve New Contract: The creative staff at The Onion, which includes various other related publications, voted to approve a new contract. Nearly 70 employees are covered by the two-year contract. The Onion Inc. Union, affiliated with the Writers Guild of America, East, wrote: "We’re elated to have reached a first union contract for the members at Onion Inc. In addition to the gains made in our contract, we experienced immediate workplace improvements while organizing, including increased interdepartmental communication and a gender pay parity analysis. As part of the WGAE, we have access to resources and the solidarity of thousands of union members across media and entertainment. We’re proud to be part of a wave that’s raising standards across the industry and we encourage everyone to organize their workplaces."

Law360 Editorial Staffers Unanimously Approve First Contract: After a two-year battle, members of The NewsGuild-CWA who work as editorial staff at LexisNexis-owned Law360, a legal news site, unanimously approved their first contract. The four-year agreement includes a 22% raise and a minimum annual salary of $50,000. In a statement, the unit said: "Last night, we unanimously (168-0!) ratified a remarkable first contract that fiercely protects and improves the working conditions of everyone in the newsroom at Law360. For years, we have been adamant about protecting the editorial integrity of the newsroom and of our bargaining unit. We successfully negotiated language that prevents the company from reinstating non-compete agreements and onerous daily story quotas. We also achieved a provision that preserves the contract in the event of a sale or acquisition of the company."

New York Media Editorial Employees Join NewsGuild: After nearly 80% of eligible staffers signed on, editorial employees of New York Media voted to be represented by The NewsGuild of New York-CWA. The new unit would cover 160 full- and part-time staffers and has asked the company for voluntary recognition of the union. A mission statement from the new unit said: "We believe that unionizing is the best way to address our grievances in the workplace and allow us to continue publishing stories as honest, gritty, and exceptional as this city. We hope that New York Media will recognize our union so that we can begin an amicable collective-bargaining process and build a stronger, more equitable company for another 50 years."

New York City Rideshare App Drivers Win Historic Pay Rules: After a campaign by the Independent Drivers Guild (an affiliate of the Machinists) that involved rallying 16,000 drivers to events, lobbying days and thousands of calls and letters, drivers for rideshare apps in New York have won a minimum pay rate that is equivalent to the city's $15 per hour minimum wage. "Today we brought desperately needed relief to 80,000 working families. All workers deserve the protection of a fair, livable wage and we are proud to be setting the new bar for contractor workers’ rights in America," said Jim Conigliaro Jr., founder of the Independent Drivers Guild. "We are thankful to the Mayor, Commissioner Joshi and the Taxi and Limousine Commission, City Council Member Brad Lander and all of the city officials who listened to and stood up for drivers."

Nurses at NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital Win Union Election: Nurses at the hospital in Cortlandt, New York, voted to join the New York State Nurses Association after an anti-union campaign that led to state officials vowing to investigate labor abuses alleged against the hospital. Nurse and organizer Susan Beck said: "We got an email from our president that said respect will be at the center of how we will continue to work together. That’s what nurses really wanted in the first place."

Educators at Acero Charter Schools Reach Agreement to End Strike: Educators at Acero charter schools in Chicago ended the first strike in charter school history by reaching a tentative agreement with the school network. The 500 educators won pay improvements, reductions in class sizes and language that makes the school a sanctuary for the schools' immigrant students, including protection against federal immigration enforcement on school grounds. Chicago Teachers Union President Jesse Sharkey said: "This was the culmination of our vision over more than a decade of organizing. Our vision is that educators at charter schools and at Chicago Public Schools have common interests. We live in the same neighborhoods, we teach the same kids, and we wage the same struggles over resources and underfunding. We are now a movement that commands national attention and can stop a city."

Environmental Charter School Educators Vote to Join AFT: Educators at Environmental Charter School in Pittsburgh voted to join the AFT. The new unit will represent teachers, nurses, counselors, social workers, academic coaches and educational assistants. They will now proceed with negotiations on their first union contract.

Steelworkers Ratify Contract with ArcelorMittal: Some 15,000 United Steelworkers members have a new four-year labor agreement with ArcelorMittal USA that increases wages and benefits. The workers in six states had voted to authorize a strike during the acrimonious negotiations. David McCall, lead negotiator for USW District 1, said: "We successfully defended all of the rights and protections that management sought to reduce, restrict and eliminate. On top of that, we were able to make improvements, fill gaps and fix the parts of our contracts that members identified as top priorities."

Oregon Mental Health and Addiction Recovery Workers Join AFSCME: Nearly 270 mental health and addiction recovery workers at Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare in Portland and Milwaukie, Oregon, voted to join AFSCME. The workers are pushing for better pay and lower case loads. The fight for unionization at the clinics was a unwelcome one from management, which held numerous anti-union meetings and AFSCME has filed charges against Cascadia for improperly firing a union supporter.

Laid Off Toys 'R' Us Workers Secure $20 Million in Severance Fight: In the process of Toys "R" Us filing for bankruptcy in 2018, 31,000 employees were laid off and did not get severance payments. Meanwhile, some top executives got bonuses. The laid-off workers fought back and have negotiated a settlement with Bain Capital and KKR, private equity firms that owned part of the toy retailer, to pay $20 million in severance payments.

Kenneth Quinnell Tue, 01/15/2019 - 09:17

#StopTheShutdown: The Working People Weekly List

Tue, 15 Jan 2019 13:45:00 +0000

#StopTheShutdown: The Working People Weekly List

Working People Weekly List
AFL-CIO

Every week, we bring you a roundup of the top news and commentary about issues and events important to working families. Here’s this week’s Working People Weekly List.

State of the Unions: Special #StopTheShutdown Episode: A Conversation with AFGE President J. David Cox: "With the government shutdown in its third week, Julie and Tim talk to J. David Cox Sr., national president of AFGE. Cox says his members are being held hostage by extremist politics and is calling on all working people to demand that Congress and the White House reopen the government and put federal employees back to work."

Our Paycheck Is Not a Bargaining Chip: "It’s day 20 of the government shutdown, and the AFL-CIO has called upon the entire labor movement to fight for our affected brothers and sisters."

End the Shutdown: What Working People Are Doing This Week: "Welcome to our regular feature, a look at what the various AFL-CIO unions and other working family organizations are doing across the country and beyond. The labor movement is big and active—here's a look at the broad range of activities we're engaged in this week."

Economy Gains 312,000 Jobs in December; Unemployment Rises to 3.9%: "The U.S. economy gained 312,000 jobs in December, and the unemployment rate rose to 3.9%, according to figures released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This report shows an increase in unemployed workers and while wage gains are stronger, they are not consistent with a tight labor market. This ongoing financial and economic volatility means that the Federal Reserve needs to hold off on more rate increases."

AFL-CIO's Top 10 Blog Posts of 2018: "Today, we are taking a moment to reflect on a historic year for collective action by highlighting the top 10 most-read posts on the AFL-CIO blog in 2018. Throughout the year, working people across the country joined together to build a better America. These are our stories."

New Congress Begins with Influx of Worker-Friendly Members: "The 116th Congress begins today and it features a diverse group of members who are more friendly to working people than their predecessors in recent Congresses. Not only does the new class of incoming senators and representatives have the largest group of women ever and the first Native American women, the first Muslim American women and the first openly bisexual senator, it features a dozen union members and even more worker-friendly members."

Stop the Shutdown: "The government shutdown is now in its 12th day, meaning some 800,000 federal employees are still without a paycheck because President Donald Trump refuses to sign a federal budget that doesn’t include $5 billion for a border wall. Working people—and their livelihoods—should never be used as political pawns. As congressional leaders prepare to meet with Trump later today, take action now to stop the shutdown."

UAW Releases 2019 Union-Made Vehicle Buying Guide: "No matter when you are buying a new vehicle or for what purpose, you have the opportunity to use this substantial buying power to support working people. The UAW releases a guide every year that lets consumers know which cars are union-made in America. Here is this year's list."

Ohio’s Ironworkers Local 290 Invests in the Future: "One of the country’s best-kept secrets is that the American labor movement trains more workers than any organization other than the U.S. military. Apprenticeships and job training programs represent a powerful, life-changing opportunity that unions are in a unique position to provide. When those resources are made readily available to working people, membership growth often follows."

Kenneth Quinnell Tue, 01/15/2019 - 08:45

   
  

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